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Welcome Home Firebird 91!

This website is devoted Capt. Herbert C. Crosby, MIA Vietnam 10 January 1970. His remains were repatriated in 1989, with positive identification in 2006. His remains were laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery on May 25, 2007 with full military honors, including a three helicopter fly-over.

Here you will find the analysis information, along with stories, photos, videos of events that led up to the burial. You will also find extraordinary post burial events that keep his name and his story alive. You were never forgotten, and you live on in the hearts of us all.

If you wore a POW/MIA bracelet with Capt. Crosby’s name on it and would like to return it, leave us a message on the Bracelets page.

ARMY SOLDIER MIA REMAINS FROM VIETNAM WAR
ARE IDENTIFIED

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced December 19, 2006 that the remains of three U.S. servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and returned to their families for burial with full military honors.They are Capt. Herbert C. Crosby, of Donalsonville, Ga., Sgt. 1st Class Wayne C. Allen, of Tewksbury, Mass., and Sgt. 1st Class Francis G. Graziosi, of Rochester, N.Y., all U.S. Army. On Jan. 10, 1970, these men were returning to their base at Chu Lai, South Vietnam aboard a UH-1C Huey helicopter. Due to bad weather, their helicopter went down over Quang Nam Province. A search was initiated for the crew, but no sign of the helicopter or crew was spotted.In 1989, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) gave to U.S. specialists 25 boxes containing the remains of the U.S. servicemen related to this incident. Later that year, additional remains and Crosby’s identification tag were obtained from a Vietnamese refugee.Between 1993 and 1999, joint U.S./S.R.V. teams, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), conducted three investigations in Ho Chi Minh City and two investigations in Quang Nam-Da Nang Province (formerly Quang Nam Province). A Vietnamese informant in Ho Chi Minh City told the team he knew where the remains of as many as nine American servicemen were buried. He agreed to lead the team to the burial site. In 1994, the team excavated the site and recovered a metal box and several bags containing human remains, including those of these three soldiers.Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used mitochondrial DNA and dental comparisons in the identification of the remains.

firebird nine one crew drawing

Firebird 91 Crew

[Note from website author:  Information is being transferred and added daily so do check back for updates.]

4 Responses to Home

  1. Don Indra says:

    I was with Delta 4/31 196 LIB out west Lz Siberia during that time. I remember there was sadness thru out the company. It was like we lost one of our own men because they were our life line to the world Don

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  2. Lee De Spain says:

    My grandfather served in Vietnam and retired from the military. As a boy growing up my grandpa always told me he served his time so I didn’t have to. Honoring our service men and women Has always been the 11th commandment for our family and POWs and MIAs have always been close to my family’s hearts.

    In the summer of 2001, I was 13 and took a business trip with my father to Hot Springs,VA. On our way we stopped in Indiana where my grandparents are from and live to visit for a couple days and then continue onto Virginia. We arrived to the job site and it wasn’t ready for the equipment to be installed and the Contractor insisted for a few more days. My father immediately told me this was a great opportunity to visit D.C and to see the Vietnam wall as well as the other monuments. That trip just me and my dad was one of the best few days of my life. While visiting the Vietnam wall I learned about POW/MIA bracelets. Since I’ve always loved my great state of Oklahoma I knew I had to have a bracelet from Oklahoma. We searched and searched for a bracelet. When I found Capt. Herbert C. Crosby. The biography for him said he was from Indiana and stationed out of FT Sill, OK. He was born in the same month as I was (may). When. I picked that bracelet up I felt humbled. And with all the connections i knew it was the one. Immediately after we bought it i wore it. I also had to have the rubbing of Capt. Crosby’s name off the wall. It was a real life experience for me and showed me a lot about our heros. I wore the bracelet for many years. Through my teenage years. I only placed it in a safe spot because I always knew it was something dear to me. The scuff marks on it now are memories of my teenage years. It is still one of my most prized positions. it’s one thing I’ve always held on to. We live in Moore,OK and on May 20,2013 it rode out an F5 tornado. I pulled it out tonight and wore it for a while and told my wife and daughter about it and read his bio to them and I decided to Google Capt. Crosby and found your website.

    Your brother has became part of my family and the bracelet I wear for him means so much. I’m glad he is resting back home. I plan to take my children to Arlington to visit him and tell them about our nation’s heros.

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your sacrifice Capt Crosby and thank you Mrs. Wade for the lovely website and the information.

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    • You brought wonderful tears to my eyes as I read your story Lee. Goosebumps and chills, too. Thank you (and your family) so much for caring and supporting our military,POWs and MIAs. We have many still missing, which makes my heart ache, but to know we have so many people who care is extraordinary. Don’t know if you read my brother’s letter home from Vietnam on his birthday in 1969, but he wrote that he hoped if he died, not making it home, that his duty was not in vain. That is my mission, to let him know he did not die in vain. Hence, the scholarship in his name and honor with the Army ROTC at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. These young men and women are our future, and it is very bright with them at the helm.
      A lot of good things have come about due to his tragic loss in war. The scholarship yes, but also for me, I am now personal friends with many of his Summer ’69 comrades. I lost one brother, but gained a whole Company and Battalion of brothers. I’m a member of their Association (Rattler-Firebird.org). The Association meets twice a year (reunion). Nothing better than being among helicopter pilots from Vietnam, and especially ones that knew and flew with my brother. Amazing for me.

      Special thank you to your grandfather, he knows the pain everyone went through, and the struggles today. He’s a hero.
      Prayers for safety in this crazy weather world we live in.
      Thank you so much Lee. Herby would have been in awe of the attention he has received, and humbled beyond belief. I know I am.

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